Artist Guidance

Steps to Photographing and Framing Your Artworks

Annexure 1 – Photographing your Artwork.

As artists, we spend a ton of time perfecting our craft and then, after hours of working on a painting, exhausted and up against a deadline, we often neglect the most important part of the process photographing the work. Too many of us are a little lost when it comes to the specifics and settle for a few sloppy shots before shipping the artwork out.
Since artists are required to submit work digitally for exhibitions, grants, talks and your public profile page, good photography offers the first impression of your art and your professionalism.

We put together a few guidelines to photographing your artwork so you can begin to photograph your artwork like a pro.

1. Hang your artwork on the wall

We regularly see artwork photographed leaned up against a wall and shot from a downward angle. Find a neutral colored wall (white, black, gray) and hang your work at a height where the middle of your piece will be parallel to where your camera will be—either on a tripod or resting sturdily on a table or other surface.

2. Light your work properly

Once your artwork is secured to the wall, double check that the camera is set to the lens lines up with the middle of the painting. You want to position your camera so that the frame is filled with most of the painting, with a bit of background that you can crop out later. It is important for many juries to see the edges of the paintings to get a sense of scale.

Photo taken in natural daylight

Photo taken indoors with the lights on

This is my view when I’m standing in front the painting and holding the phone directly

3. Adjust your camera and settings

Once your artwork is secured to the wall, double check that the camera is set to the lens lines up with the middle of the painting. You want to position your camera so that the frame is filled with most of the painting, with a bit of background that you can crop out later. It is important for many juries to see the edges of the paintings to get a sense of scale.

4. Camera Positioning

5. Edit your photos to perfection or Post-processing

When you crop and edit the image, note: An out of focus photo does not show a true representation of your work

Here is the final cropped version of my photograph, notice how the colours look pretty accurate, the entire painting is evenly lit and you can clearly see the impasto marks

 

Source: Images and content from internet.

I hope you've found that useful and we look forward to seeing more of your art in our gallery.

Annexure 2 - Framing an Artwork

You have 3 main choices for framing a painting:
1 – Floating Frame
2 -Traditional Frame
3 -Borderless frame

We will tell you the pros and cons of each.

You just took the picture in this gallery. You can see 4 paintings Borderless frame, 3 with traditional frames and the 2 small canvases at the top with floating frames.

1-FLOATING FRAMES

Advantages

  • Protect the canvas with the edges
  • May fit better in a contemporary decor
  • Are often less expensive because of their simplicity

Disadvantages

  • Generally heavier (therefore costlier for shipping)
  • Will gather dust on the bottom section
  • Will show irregularities in of the canvas especially if the canvas is not completely square

2-TRADITIONAL FRAMES

Advantages

  • Offers the best protection against damage and dust
  • Is often associated with pricier art, so it has a prestige associated with it
  • Comes in more choices

Disadvantages

  • Covers part of the canvas which often results in a change of color under the part covered or worst, damage to the paint layer from friction.
  • Makes the painting larger, heavier and costlier to ship
  • Good quality frames are pricier and do not necessarily add value to the painting

3-BORDERLESS FRAME

Advantages

  • Has a very contemporary feel and fits in most decor
  • Easy to light (no shadow from a frame)

Disadvantages

  • Offers no protection from dust to the canvas
  • Paintings that are moved or manipulated often will quickly show wear around the edges
  • May tend to warp more without a solid frame to stabilize them.

Source: Internet by Eric Vanasse, Artist.

 
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